Hello everyone! I wanted to let you know that after one week being able to focus on my house I am quite sure I made the right decision. I finally feel organized on top of things, rather than 3 steps behind, and I have gotten so much done and I am a much more pleasant person to be around ūüėČ

And, although temporarily leaving my job was a big leap of faith, I am already so grateful for the notes of encouragement I’ve gotten from people, saying they are inspired by what I am doing and wanting to support me to finish my project. At least for this first week, my lack of income has been made up by donation on my indiegogo site, igg.me/at/tinygogo. So thank you so much!!

And I promise you, I have not just been lounging around lazily on my couch with this extra time. Upon deciding to take a leave from Hammerstone and having that big scary conversation with Maria, but having it go better than I could have ever dreamed (she says she wants me to hopefully come back full time after my house is done!), I went home and made this massive To Do list:

IMG_4360

I figure this To Do list will take me from now until at least the end of October. But note that some things are already checked off!!

And then I took off for the Mother Earth News Fair, which I wrote about in an earlier Blog post. This was the perfect way for me to celebrate making this shift in my life.

So what have I gotten done this past week? I ordered my metal roof, which should arrive tomorrow if I am lucky! I finishes putting purlins on my roof and got all my stickers and two pairs of saw horses made in preparation for all my window trim and siding wood to come. And indeed, I was all prepared when it came from a local saw mill, Cory Schillif, on Thursday!

IMG_4352

Stickering wood is important to let it dry properly and minimize the chances of it warping or twisting too much. It also helps to prevent mold and bugs that might like to take home in a pile of wet wood.

Yes, it is the sad truth, until now I have used the one pair of plastic sawhorses that I borrowed from John. Now I have my own! And they are beautiful and have already come in handy...

Yes, it is the sad truth, until now I have used the one pair of plastic sawhorses that I borrowed from John. Now I have my own! And they are beautiful and have already come in handy…

So once my wood arrived I got to work on my window trim, and I have to say I couldn’t be more pleased with how it has come out! I am using a pine tar – linseed oil stain from this company called solvent free paints¬†and it is pretty cool stuff! The pine tar is a natural wood preservative with a gentle antiseptic and water repellent effect. And Linseed oil helps to nourish the wood, like moisturizer for our skin!

IMG_4353Now, my windows have been a bit of a struggle. Because I decided to use mostly found and salvaged windows (not recommended) I have had some problems with leaking on more than one of them. It has gotten to the point where I have even considered tearing out a few of them and replacing them (not something any builder wants to have to do, especially on a new construction project!). But I have also recognized that once my metal roof goes on with eaves, and if I do a good job with the window trim the windows they will be much better protected when all is said and done than they are now. Another challenge I was facing when designing my window trim details was that my walls are going to be build out. Meaning that from the sheathing plane I am adding 1 1/4″ of roxul board, the 1/2″ furring strips and then my siding. So How could I design window trim that would act as extension jambs and trim all in one? And that I would still like aesthetically?

Well, here is what I came up with:

trial window #1

trial window #1

My trim is 1 1/2″ thick larch from a local saw mill. Larch is often used for decks and other outdoor applications because it is one of our local naturally rot resistant species. And, another cool fact, it is a deciduous conifer, meaning it looks like an evergreen but it loses its leaves in the fall!

I assembled the trim with this wood on edge, using 3 1/2″ stock for the sides and top and 4 1/2″ stock for the bottom to create a sill that stick out slightly further than the rest. The bottom is beveled at 10 degrees in order to shed water, which I did by ripping the back edge on the table saw. And the top is beveled at 5 degrees, which is barely noticeable to the eye but will still shed water.

Here you can see all the frames for one side of my house assembled, waiting to be installed!

IMG_4354

Then I installed them using pocket screws on the sides and top so that the holes will be invisible, and putting a bead of caulk also on the sides and top to help create a water tight seal.

IMG_4356

With this design it didn’t matter that some of my windows are¬†basically flush with my sheathing plane and some have J-channels so they stuck out and inch or so beyond that plane. The depth of these frames was able to accommodate all of that and will also accommodate¬†the roxul board that will be going on soon (you can see one board up in the photo above.

Lastly, I did an important flashing detail above each window.

I made these myself using the break we have at Hammerstone. This is the basic design and then I actually ended up folding each end in a way that creates almost a little bathtub to shed all water out.

I made these myself using the metal break we have at Hammerstone. This is the basic design and then I actually ended up folding each end in a way that creates almost a little bathtub to shed all water out.

And below you can see them installed. I slit the house wrap right above the window trim and put another bead of caulk behind the flashing, which got nailed directing the the sheathing with roofing nails, and the I taped the over the corners again.

IMG_4359

I am very pleased overall with how these came out and am actually kind of looking forward to a good rain to test them. But I also hope to have my metal roof on by the end of this week, so that will also add much protection to my whole structure!

Cheers, and thanks again for reading. And Happy full moon eclipse! What a sight that was last night!

Advertisements