As got on the bus to head towards the Denver, CO airport to end an almost two week vacation I got a text from my buddy Amy saying that our trailers were ready! After much anticipatory anxiety where I was convinced the trailers were going to be ready the day after I left town, the timing ended up being perfect. Two weeks away meant I got to take a break from tiny house planning (which was starting to feel a little like tiny house obsessing) and refresh myself before coming home and jumping back in.

So now that the trailers were finally ready we had to secure two trucks to go pick them up in Locke, NY, about a half hour away. Somehow I thought it would be as simple as finding two friends with pick up trucks with 2 5/16″ ball hitches. I didn’t realize that with a trailer this size things get a little more complicated. But only a little, thanks to some great friends who guided us along. So what do you need to tow an 8′ by 24′ trailer?

  1. A seven prong blade style electrical wiring adaptor. This allows the trailer to plug into the truck’s electrical system so that when you brake the trailer’s brakes are also activated. Thankfully these only cost about $10 at our local trux outfitters store.
  2. 2 5/16″ ball hitch. These can also be bought for about $12 at a tractor supply store
  3. Brake box. This little box gets wired into your truck up by the dashboard and turns out to be the most expensive part (a couple hundred dollars).

We almost decided to just pay Locke Enterprises to deliver them, but In the end we managed to borrow one truck that already had all the wiring and the brake box and we took two trips out to Locke Enterprises in one day to get Amy and my trailer.

Our brand new, custom trailers! Each of them cost $3722.75, hopefully the single most expensive item for our tiny houses, but well worth having a solid foundation

Our brand new, custom trailers! From Locke enterprises in Locke, NY. Each of them cost $3722.75, hopefully the single most expensive item for our tiny houses, but well worth having a solid foundation

Steve and our little friend make sure everything is hooked up correctly and securely.

Steve and our little friend make sure everything is hooked up correctly and securely.

As steve, the owner of Locke Enterprises, gave us the “tour” of our new trailers we learned a few more handy things. The little box in the picture above contains a back up battery that will kick in and engage the brakes if somehow the trailer were to become unhooked from the truck. Before driving its good to check that the battery is charged, which can be done with a “test light,” which can also be bought pretty cheaply from a tractor supply store. He also explained to us how to put a few squirts of grease in the axle by just taking off the cap at the center of the wheel and that this should probably be done each time we move our tiny houses since they will likely have been sitting for quite a while.

Ready to rock and roll!

Ready to rock and roll!

backing up a trailer this size is no easy task. A handy trick we learned is hold you hand at the bottom of your steering wheel because then which ever direction your hand goes will be the direction the trailer will go.

backing up a trailer this size is no easy task. A handy trick we learned is hold you hand at the bottom of your steering wheel because then which ever direction your hand goes will be the direction the trailer will go.

And we did it! Both trailers in place on our building site :)

And we did it! Both trailers safely in place on our building site!

Itching to build!

Itching to build!

Despite my fears that something would go wrong, in the end all went amazingly smoothly. I have to thank my friend Hank for doing a lot f the research on what our trucks would need to be able to haul these things, and Amy’s friend Steve, for being so generous with his truck, which happened to have all the right wiring, and Locke Enterprises for all their amazing work.

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