The Dream

Hello! Below is the first articulation of our dream from my old blog:

The Dream: Our very own, hand sculpted, cob house

1/13/2011

“Work is Love Made Visible”

Welcome to Sculpting Earth, a blog documenting the story of a young couple and their journey to create a wholesome, low impact, simple and joyous life. Our first step in this journey is the creation of a home. We have chosen cob as our primary building material.

It is the beginning of 2011, a new year, a time of change and transition. Tomorrow Peter and I will leave Gainesville, FL to drive all the way to Ithaca, NY, where we will start a new chapter of our lives together, in the same place. Finally! As I have spent the last two weeks in Gainesville with Peter, helping him get ready to close this chapter of his life, both our minds have been buzzing, as busy as bees, with our dream to build a cob house. But it is no longer just a dream. We are going to actually do it!

The book, The Hand-Sculpted House, by Ianto Evans, Michael G. Smith, and Linda Smiley has not left my bag in the two weeks I have been in Gainesville. Peter has bought a measuring tape to take the dimensions of spaces he likes; what height ceiling feels good? How wide should a counter top be? How high up should the cabinets be? We are starting the process of collecting information, taking notes, and brainstorming possible layouts. And, in preparation, this summer Peter and I will be taking a 6-week course in permaculture and green building at the Sirius community in Western Massachusetts.

Cob is simply amazing. It’s both of those things, truly; simple and amazing. It’s simply sand, straw, clay, and water. All things that come from the earth and can go back to the earth. And it’s really quite amazing. Its warm in the winter, cool in the summer, yet aesthetically beautiful and will withstand the test of time. It’s also accessible to all. Anyone who is interested enough can have his or her own cob house. They can cost as little as $500 and they don’t require expertise. They are not exclusive to the rich, the progressive, or the artistically inclined. Ancient mansions have been built with cob, and modern architects have used it too. But also nine year olds have built their own playhouses with this simple, elegant, time-tested method.

We plan to break ground for our cob house as soon as the weather gets warm enough in 2012, somewhere in the Ithaca area. Come December 22nd, 2012, both my birthday, and the possible “end of the world” (or more hopefully a time of great energy shift), we hope to be moved in for the cold winter months.

What do we still need? This is our dream, but we want you to share it with us! We want your support and your help and we will give you stories and pictures and opportunities to learn and be inspired. Join us! We will send out periodic newsletters, probably less frequently this year and more frequently come 2012, and we will keep a corresponding blog where the latest updates and pictures will be posted. Whether you are rich in money, time, or materials you want to get rid of, there is almost certainly a way you can help us.

As of now we still do not have a site picked out, and we would love your help in finding a building site. We are considering many options; buying a cheap plot of land, using a friends piece of land, making an agreement with a landowner that we will build them a beautiful house that will eventually be theirs if we can have it rent free for the first ten years… there are many possibilities so for now we wait for an opportunity to present itself.

We are also looking for donations. Cob houses are cheap but there will still be expenses. Our goal is to raise at least $15,000 to go towards building the house. Its a fair amount of money but for a house?! That’s nothing. And we will show you how beautiful a house can be with just $15,000. Cob houses are a multifaceted expression of sustainability, ecology, values, harmony, permaculture, ethics, and love through functional art.

Most importantly, we want you to come help us build! We guarantee it will be an experience filled with learning and enrichment for the soul. The hardest part of building a cob house is having the time and the labor. But the building of cob also lends itself easily to bringing people together and forming community through shared experience. This is a hand-sculpted house. We will literally be sculpting the house as if it were one big clay sculpture. You don’t need to be artistic or have skills in construction to come help though. Whether you decide your place is in mixing the cob with your feet, laying cob loaves to help us build a 3-foot thick wall, or sculpting the archway to heaven as our front door, I am sure you will discover something profound for you. It’s fun and therapeutic work. Come for an hour or two if you are curious, come for a day if you are dying to come but have a tight schedule, or come for a week or even a month. We will probably be living in tents or possibly yurts, and we would love for you to join us.

****

We have now both completed the permaculture course and the green building course (such valuable courses for anyone on this earth!) and, of course, with new information to better inform our decisions are dream has been evolving. We probably will not be breaking ground in spring of 2012, but who knows, it is still a possibility.

I have now embarked on a journey to continue gaining knowledge and experience, exploring all facets of the homesteading lifestyle, which from what I have seen so far, encompasses a wide spread of possibilities. The image that this lifestyle is, by nature, all consuming and generally occurs only on the fringe of society, in rural, isolated areas by people who look like the stereotypical image of a hippie has been shattered once and for all for me. Of course I had my suspicions that the these stereotypes did not have to define the homesteading lifestyle but now I am seeing with my own two eyes that homesteading can be many things. One particularly illustrative experience was my almost two week stay at a small, off grid homestead just a ten minute drive from downtown Guelph, a city in Ontario, Canada. Here I met a woman (whose name shall remain anonymous) who had tired of the upkeep, bills, and clutter of her large suburban house that she felt was keeping her from doing what she really wanted to do. Finally, in her mid thirties she ended her lease sold and gave away most of her belongings and began to live in a nomad’s teepee. Now, almost 4 years later, she lives in a beautiful, clutter free, 25 foot diameter yurt, and pays no bills other then her car insurance and cell phone bill. Her only electricity comes from a single solar panel that allows her to have a few lights and charge her computer and cell phone. Her food is kept very simply in a ice box that is half underground, accessible through a trap door in the floor of her yurt. This simple method requires no electricity; they simply put a block of ice in the bottom that lasts almost a week in even the hottest days of summer! Their water for washings and cooking comes from rain barrels or the stream, and the drinking water they bring in in carboys that they refill from a friend’s well in town. All food is cooked on either an indoor or outdoor wood stove and they grow some, but not all of their vegetables on site. The site is only accessible down a 1/4 of a mile path through a beautiful cedar forest, so all materials are brought in by wheelbarrow.

And yet what amazed me was that this life did not feel like a lifestyle for only the most extreme. Let me explain; First, the yurt itself felt amazing spacious, clean and homey. Second, this woman, rather then being consumed by this homesteading lifestyle, did indeed seem freed by it. Since leaving her suburban home she had founded a non profit that worked on water issues, was the executive director of this non profit and was a very respectable professional woman by any standard who got up and went to work every day. She also had a beautiful, incredibly articulate three year old daughter (who yes, she had given birth to and raised in her yurt) and was pregnant with her second child. She was a normal woman who had deeply questioned the way she had been living and started living by her values. And the result was beautiful.

This stay in Canada, where I was helping to insulate a second, 11′ by 10′ wood cabin with slip straw and earth plaster, is just the beginnings of my explorations and learnings, but it was an excited start after having completed by permaculture and green building course. Here are a few pictures of the project I was working on in Canada:

Mixing the cob. All it is is 1 part clay, 3 parts sand, some straw, and a bit of water.

Mixing clay slip. We found and dug the clay from a local swamp!

We stuffed the walls with straw tossed in clay slip (a straw salad). Its all help in place with chicken wire. Then we use earth plaster (also just finely cut straw, clay, sand, and water in slightly different proportions) to plaster onto the chicken wire.

A close up of the wall. On the left you can see the base coat of earth plaster while on the right is the straw still exposed.

Here it is getting close to done! It will still probably get a finish layer that may be a lighter color earth plaster or lime finish.

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4 Comments

    1. It’s one of my favorites on the topic of cob. I read it cover to cover and loved every minute of it! In a month or two I will be working on a cob house of a friend and I will have many more posts on cob!

      Like

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